Monday, April 18, 2011

Upcoming Talks

I'll be giving at least two talks at conferences this year:

Ancestral Health Symposium; "The Human Ecological Niche and Modern Health"; August 5-6 in Los Angeles. This is going to be a great conference. Many of my favorite health/nutrition writers will be presenting. Organizer Brent Pottenger and I collaborated on designing the symposium's name so I hope you like it.

My talk will be titled "Obesity; Old Solutions to a New Problem." I'll be presenting some of my emerging thoughts on obesity. I expect to ruffle some feathers!

Tickets are going fast so reserve one today! I doubt there will be any left two weeks from now.


TEDx Harvard Law; "Food Policy and Public Health"; Oct 21 at Harvard. My talk is tentatively titled "The American Diet: a Historical Perspective." This topic interests me because it helps us frame the discussion on why chronic disease is so prevalent today, and what are the appropriate public health measures to combat it. This should also be a great conference.

16 comments:

David L said...

Interesting historical article about eating in Boston restaurants 150 years ago:

http://wap.boston.com/art/35/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/04/17/food_city/?p=1

Simple Mama said...

I've been following your blog for a few months, and have read most posts from the beginning (fascinating). I live near the Boston area and am wondering how to access the talk at Harvard in October.

David said...

The woman silhouetted on the Ancestral Health Symposium poster appears to be using modern hair products. Free of endocrine disruptors, etc.?

Emily Deans, M.D. said...

That's terrific - it's a TED talk so I assume it will be available online? I will be at AHS of course but given Harvard Law ain't too far away from me will endeavor to make that one. Congrats on scoring a TED talk!

Stephan Guyenet said...

Hi Simple Mama,

I don't know yet. They haven't even officially announced the conference. I'll post more details when I have them.

Hi Emily,

Thanks. I don't know whether or not it will be made available online. I'll post more information when I have it. See you at AHS!

Aravind said...

Hello Stephan,

I am trying to attend AHS (live in MI so not a quick trip). A question I have for you - since you only get 15 minutes, are you planning on presenting new material, a summary of previous items you've blogged about, or a combination of both?

Logistics aside, I would attend in a heartbeat so I am just weighing the costs/benefits.

Thanks!
Aravind

cassan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
cassan said...

Stephan,

Will your talks be filmed and put online?

Also, do you have a channel on Youtube or Vimeo?

Be well, Colin M.

Dominic DiCarlo said...

David L said...
Interesting historical article about eating in Boston restaurants 150 years ago:

http://wap.boston.com/art/35/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2011/04/17/food_city/?p=1


I just want to add more on this.
The article in the Boston Globe focused on Boston restaurants but New York restaurants are emphasized in the current spring issue of Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture. The article's title is "High End Dining in the Nineteenth-Century United States" - both articles are adapted from "American Restaurants and Cuisine in the Mid-Nineteenth Century," in the New England Quarterly, March 2011 - which is available online. The New England Quarterly article was written by Paul Freedman (professor of history at Yale) but co-authored with James Warlick on the shorter adapted articles.

elhnad said...

Great stuff, can't wait for the upcoming months

radical new york said...

Hello Stephen,

I was browsing some older posts and noticed that you had previously covered the topics of polyphenols, antioxidencts, glutathione, etc. All the data seems pretty inconclusive (purely due to lack of research into these areas). I was just wondering quickly your opinion on the ALDH mutation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetaldehyde_dehydrogenase#Role_in_metabolism_of_alcohol

Namely, do you think means of improving the antioxidant system (eg: eating garlic to rev up glutathione) would offset any damage from excess acetaldehyde?

I don't mean to sounds so off-topic, or like I'm asking for medical advice. It's just a very interesting topic (is this an evolutionary advantage?), and it brings up an old debate on the antioxidants. Should we recommend Vits ACE, selenium and garlic to our "Asian flush" friends?

Just wondered your thoughts. Thanks!

emedicalpoint said...

Really interesting articles......I would be happy to publish this articles in my web portal www.emedicalpoint.com and health blog spot .. emedicalpoint.blogspot.com

Aravind said...

Hello Stephan,

Well I have just finished reading every post you've written. Your blog is truly incredible. My wife and I will be at AHS and I hope to be able to thank you in person for the amazing content of your blog!

Warm regards,
Aravind

Stephan Guyenet said...

Hi Aravind,

Thanks for the kind comment, and I'll see you at AHS!

williebr said...

Very nice!

See if you can add a Washington, DC (NIH maybe - Gary got to talk there) date.

Whenever you get your book published I can help you find some places in DC to talk to promote that.

Aravind said...

Hello Stephan,

Since comments are still on :-)

At AHS, will you be reviewing the Food Reward series that you have been expounding recently or a different topic?

Just curious. Thanks and see you at AHS!